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Managing the Modern Workplace
V&E International Labor & Employment Resources

  • 09
  • August
  • 2018

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Why is Litigation so Expensive?

Those of us who spend time in litigation have often heard clients question why litigation has become so expensive. For some clients, it is, in part, because they were not ready for it. It is difficult to prepare for litigation when little has been done to control the explosion of information that occurs in the digitally driven modern workplace in which we live.

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  • 07
  • June
  • 2018

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All Arbitration, All the Time: Court Agrees to Hear Case on Whether an Arbitration Clause Allows Class Arbitration When the Clause Is Silent on It

As we discussed in a previous post, the Supreme Court recently ruled that employers may enforce class-waiver arbitration clauses in employment agreements and require an employee to arbitrate his claims in individual, as opposed to collective, arbitration proceedings. Hot on the heels of this recent important decision, the Court agreed to hear a case from the Ninth Circuit which addresses a related issue: whether arbitration clauses that are silent about class arbitration can nevertheless be interpreted to permit class arbitration. This may not seem consequential since many companies moving forward will opt to use class action waivers in employment agreements following the Supreme Court’s recent decision, but standard arbitration clauses are often silent on class arbitration, and many of these clauses may remain in effect for years to come. As such, the Supreme Court’s decision on this issue could have substantial implications for employers that use standard arbitration clauses in employment agreements. 

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  • 21
  • May
  • 2018

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Employers With Class Action Waivers in Arbitration Agreements Vindicated

As we have repeatedly discussed on the Managing the Modern Workplace blog, the fate of employers’ dispute resolution programs, and other arbitration clauses that include class and collective action waivers, has long hung in the balance. Today, in a 5-4 decision authored by Justice Gorsuch, the Court resolved the question of the enforceability of class and collective action waivers in favor of employers.

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Don't Be Surprised When an Employment Case Is SLAPP'ed

Consider a scenario that many in-house lawyers and HR professionals are all-too familiar with: an employee is terminated or leaves the company. After the employee’s departure, the company learns the employee has gone to work for a competitor, and after checking the employee’s computer, the company learns he plugged in a flash drive and downloaded files containing confidential information, including customer lists, just days before leaving. Under this scenario, the employee signed an employment agreement containing non-compete, non-solicit, and confidentiality provisions. 

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  • 10
  • April
  • 2018

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“Stark and Abrupt Change” Required for Constructive Notice in FMLA Cases

Many employers ignore the multitiered notice requirements of the Family Medical Leave Act (“FMLA”) (an issue that I will discuss in a future post). Nonetheless, most employers recognize that they need to be careful when terminating any employee for excessive absences or tardies if that employee ever suggested that he may be suffering, or have suffered from, a serious medical condition. It doesn’t matter if the company has tracked the employee’s absences as FMLA absences; an employer still risks being sued for FMLA interference or retaliation if the employee had provided some notice of a serious medical condition in the past. 

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Contributors

Thomas H. Wilson

Thomas H. Wilson Partner

Christopher V. Bacon

Christopher V. Bacon Counsel

Sean Becker

Sean Becker Partner

Stephen M. Jacobson

Stephen M. Jacobson Partner

Martin C. Luff

Martin Luff Counsel

Lawrence S. Elbaum Partner