X

Reset Password

Username:

Change Password

Old Password:
New Password:
We have completed your request.

False Claims Act Statistics, News & Analysis

Taking Out the Trash: District Court Grants Summary Judgment Where Federal Agencies Continued to Pay for Waste Removal Services Following Regulatory Violation

A Pennsylvania district court recently weighed in on the question of whether the government’s continued payment after the filing of a qui tam action defeats materiality under Escobar. In a decision helpful to FCA defendants, the court in United States ex rel. Cressman v. Solid Waste Services, Inc. granted the defendant summary judgment where the government continued to pay the defendant after the plaintiff filed his FCA action and DOJ declined to intervene.

Read More

It Doesn’t Take an Eisenstein to See the Eleventh Circuit Missed the Mark: New Decision Allowing Relators to Extend Statute of Limitations Is Contrary to Supreme Court Precedent and Creates Circuit Split

While not rocket science, or even particle physics, the FCA was complicated enough without introducing yet a new circuit split. Yet, in United States ex rel. Hunt v. Cochise Consultancy, Inc., the Eleventh Circuit has disagreed with at least two other circuits (the Fourth and the Tenth) in holding that relators in non-intervened qui tam actions can rely on a statutory exception to the otherwise-applicable six-year statute of limitations that allows suit to be brought within three years of when the government learns of the potential fraud. The court parted ways with the majority view that only the government can rely on this alternative provision, a rule grounded in the sensible position that the government itself is only a party when it decides to intervene. The Supreme Court in U.S. ex rel. Eisenstein v. City of New York, 556 U.S. 928 (2009), recognized as much when it held that a relator in a non-intervened case could not take advantage of the government’s sixty-day appeal period and instead had only the usual thirty days available to an ordinary party. This was because, as the Court recognized, the United States itself is not a party to the appeal in a non-intervened case. Id. at 937. Without much analysis, the Eleventh Circuit simply found Eisenstein’s reasoning inapplicable and held there was no textual basis in the FCA to prevent relators from taking advantage of the three-year alternative found in 31 U.S.C. § 3731(b)(2). Again, without much reasoning or discussion, it simply found the Fourth and Tenth Circuits unpersuasive (never mind the multiple district courts that have sided with the majority rule). 

Read More

Tour de Fraud? Lance Armstrong Settles FCA Claims Related to Doping Scandal

On April 19, 2018, former professional cyclist Lance Armstrong announced that he and the government reached a $5 million agreement to settle long-running FCA claims alleging he defrauded the government by submitting false claims for millions of dollars in United States Postal Service (“Postal Service”) sponsorship payments while lying about his use of Performance Enhancing Drugs (“PEDs”). The $5 million was a small fraction of the nearly $100 million in treble damages the government had sought.

Read More

Escobar The Sequel? — Perhaps Coming Soon to SCOTUS

On April 16, 2018, the Supreme Court called for the views of the Solicitor General (or “CVSG”) as to whether it should review the Ninth Circuit’s decision in Gilead Sciences, Inc. v. United States ex rel. Campie (that we at LLB believe was wrongly decided and have covered previously). The CVSG may indicate the Court’s willingness to provide much-needed clarification to Escobar’s materiality standard.

Read More

Escobar Matters for Discovery, Too: District Court Emphasizes Right to Broad Materiality Discovery

While most post-Escobar decisions have involved the merits, Escobar also has significant implications for the scope of materiality discovery under the FCA. Last week, in United States ex rel. California v. Paramedics Plus LLC, the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Texas became one of the first courts to directly tackle that issue in a written opinion, holding that Escobar affords FCA defendants the ability to broadly discover how the government has actually handled the disputed issue, both in that case and in other analogous situations.

Read More

Trap! Zap! Zing! — And Poof! A Florida Court Applies Escobar and Makes a $347 Million FCA Jury Verdict Disappear

On January 11, 2018, a Florida district court vacated a $350 million FCA jury verdict against defendants in U.S. ex rel. Angela Ruckh v. Salus Rehabilitation, LLC, No. 8:11-cv-1303 (M.D. Fla. Jan. 11, 2018). At trial in February 2017, relator claimed that the defendants, owners and operators of 53 specialized nursing facilities fraudulently inflated the amount of resources needed by their patients by upcoding Resource Utilization Group (“RUG”) levels to increase the amount they were able to bill Medicare and Medicaid. The jury agreed and found the defendants liable for $109.8 million in damages, which the judge then trebled to $347 million. The government had declined to intervene, but stood to reap the benefits of relator’s perseverance, but the court had other ideas.

Read More

Filter By

Sign Up for Updates

Receive email news and alerts about False Claims Act/Qui Tam Litigation from V&E

Dates

Top Posts

Follow Us On Linkedin