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False Claims Act Statistics, News & Analysis

  • 24
  • January
  • 2018

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"Taint" Theory of Damages Dead in the Seventh Circuit? One District Court Has Not Received the Message

Adopting a view that has been roundly rejected by federal circuit courts (including the Seventh Circuit), the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Illinois in United States & City of Chicago ex rel. Chicago Regional Council of Carpenters v. Sound Solutions Windows & Doors, Inc. endorsed the “taint” theory of FCA damages, awarding the full value of contracts as damages based on the defendants’ non-compliance with a contractual term, notwithstanding their complete performance of the tangible work under the contracts.

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Up-Up-And-Away: $92.9 Million FCA Verdict Balloons to $295.5 Million Judgment After Court Imposes Treble Damages and Near-Max FCA Penalties

On Friday, a Houston federal court entered judgment totaling $295.5 million in an FCA and FIRREA (Financial Institutions Reform, Recovery, and Enforcement Act of 1989) case, up from the jury’s verdict of $92.9 million. The case is United States v. Allied Home Mortgage Corporation, et al., 4:12-cv-02676-GCH (S.D. Tex.), and it centers around defaulted home mortgage loans insured through the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). We here at LLB previously wrote about the jury’s verdict in this intervened qui tam (available here).

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  • 22
  • August
  • 2017

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Government's Trip to Fairyland Comes at a Price: Sixth Circuit Vindicates FCA Defendant's Demand for Attorneys' Fees

The Sixth Circuit on Friday issued a decision holding that where the government had pursued a “nearly frivolous” theory of FCA damages wildly in excess of actual damages, defendants were entitled to recover the costs of defending themselves — even where the fraud itself was substantiated. This decision is welcome news to defendants who may not “prevail” in the common sense of the word (by fending off liability entirely) but for whom the cost of defending is driven disproportionately high by the government’s aggressive and unjustified litigation positions. And in the process, the court cast doubt on some applications of the government’s common “taint” theory of liability, under which it argues that (sometimes minor) frauds deprive the government of the full value of a contract.

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A Rebel Claim Without a Cause? Michigan Federal Court Analyzes False Claims Act Causation of Damages Standard

In the recent decision in United States v. Quicken Loans Inc., the district court found the government adequately pleaded that Quicken Loan Inc. (“Quicken”) submitted false claims and made false statements material to false claims for insurance payouts from the Federal Housing Administration (“FHA”) for defaulted FHA-insured loans that Quicken had not properly underwritten. No. 16-CV-14050, 2017 WL 930039 (E.D. Mich. Mar. 9, 2017). As a result, the Court denied most of Quicken’s motion to dismiss except for one theory of liability and certain untimely claims.

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  • 20
  • September
  • 2016

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Zero Damages Doesn’t Mean Zero Liability: DOJ Avoids Twice-Reversed False Claims Act Damages Calculation and Gets Paltry Disgorgement of Profits Instead

It is common knowledge that even if a relator or the government cannot prove the government suffered actual damages, the court may still impose FCA penalties where there is liability. But a recent district court opinion provides a reminder that the government’s recovery, even in FCA cases with zero actual damages, can contain a third component: disgorgement of profits based on claims of common law unjust enrichment, although such claims can be brought only by the government.

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