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False Claims Act Statistics, News & Analysis

Two Courts Confirm Penalties Not Yet Issued Do Not Support Reverse False Claims

The D.C. Circuit and the Tenth Circuit recently joined several other circuits, including the Fifth, Sixth, and Eighth, in holding that liability for reverse false claims cannot be based on contingent obligations to pay the government (meaning obligations to pay that may arise after future discretionary actions), reaffirming that when Congress amended the FCA in 2009 to define the term “obligation,” it intended that liability would result for reverse false claims only where there are failures to pay specific, definite obligations owed to the government.

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  • 19
  • December
  • 2017

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Escobar Makes No Dent in Criminal Materiality Rules in Fourth Circuit

Last year, we wrote about a then-pending criminal wire fraud case, United States v. Raza, and the potential impact that Escobar’s materiality holding might have on its outcome. The Fourth Circuit recently issued its opinion, deciding that Escobar, if it had any application whatsoever in the criminal law context, did not upset long-held understandings of the objective materiality standard.

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  • 28
  • September
  • 2017

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Futrell Enters the Fray on Whether the FCA Covers the E-Rate Program Despite Funding from Telecomm. Industry

Last month, a Missouri district court in U.S. ex rel. Futrell v. E-Rate Program, LLC handed down a decision of interest to the telecommunications industry. The defendant contracts with schools and school districts to help them obtain funds under the E-Rate Program, a program that provides subsidies and discounts to schools to secure affordable telecommunications and Internet access. The program is administered by USAC, a private non-profit organization subject to regulations of (but not controlled by) the FCC, and is funded by mandatory contributions from private interstate telecommunications carriers. The Futrell court found that FCA liability may exist in such circumstances, even though the USAC funds are not government dollars. The Futrell decision adds to a disagreement between at least two district courts and one circuit court on this issue.

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"Common Sense" and Concealment of Noncompliance Lead Fourth Circuit to Find Triple Canopy Invoices Hit Their Materiality Mark and Were Impliedly False Despite No Specific False Representations

Earlier this week, the Fourth Circuit issued its first substantive post-Escobar implied certification opinion in the closely watched U.S. ex rel. Badr v. Triple Canopy. Prior to Escobar, the Fourth Circuit found that the government’s complaint-in-intervention stated an implied certification FCA claim, causing Triple Canopy to seek cert. After issuing the Escobar opinion, the Supreme Court remanded the case to the Court of Appeals to reconsider in light of Escobar. The Fourth Circuit largely affirmed its prior decision, finding that the government had sufficiently alleged both falsity and materiality. [Disclosure:  Two of the authors of this piece represented amici in support of Triple Canopy’s cert. petition.]

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False Claims Act Cert. Monitor: Solicitor General Presents Hurdle to Clearing the Public Disclosure Bar

Several months ago, we reported that the Supreme Court had called for the views of the Solicitor General (“CVSG”) on a relator’s cert. petition about the FCA public disclosure bar in U.S. ex rel. Advocates for Basic Legal Equality, Inc. v. U.S. Bank, N.A. (“ABLE”), No. 16-130. You can read our summary of the case in that blog post here. The Solicitor General has now weighed in.

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Nursing Homes Save Payment for Another Day as Court Grants Emergency Motion to Stay $347 Million in Judgments Against Them

We last reported on United States and Florida ex rel. Ruckh v. CMC II, LLC, et al., 8:11-cv-1303 (M.D. Fl.) earlier this month, when a federal jury returned a verdict for $115 million against the defendant nursing homes, finding that defendants had submitted false claims to Medicare and Medicaid for unnecessary patient care or patient care that was never supplied.  After trebling and additional penalties, CMC II and the other corporate defendants now face over $347 million in damages.  In an unusual turn of events, the defendants filed an emergency motion on March 13 in which they asked the court to stay the execution of judgments pending the Court’s consideration of one or more post-trial motions to be filed by the end of March.  The emergency motion went unopposed, and the court granted the motion.

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