X

Reset Password

Username:

Change Password

Old Password:
New Password:
We have completed your request.

False Claims Act Statistics, News & Analysis

Impact of First Circuit's 2015 Gadbois' Decision on First-to-File Bar Limited by District Court on Remand

In a post right before the holidays, we noted that the district court in United States ex rel. Estate of Gadbois v. PharMerica Corp. interpreted the FCA’s government action bar as a perpetual bar to all claims brought by a relator in a qui tam action in which the government has intervened and settled, even when the government did not intervene in or settle all of the claims. No. 10-cv-471, 2017 WL 5466659 (D.R.I. Nov. 13, 2017). But there is more to the district court’s decision than the government action bar. In its government action bar analysis, the district court made a fairly technical civil procedure ruling that, if followed by other courts, should limit the ability of relators to use the First Circuit’s previous Gadbois decision to evade the FCA’s first-to-file bar and statute of limitations.

Read More

A Bad Week for Copycat Relators: Fourth and D.C. Circuits Say First-to-File Bars Cases Brought While Earlier-Filed Cases Were Pending Even After Earlier Case Is Dismissed

Defendants facing serial, related qui tam cases should breathe a collective sigh of relief because the Fourth Circuit and the D.C. Circuit have just rejected relators’ efforts to undermine the first-to-file bar. In decisions issued less than a week apart, the D.C. Circuit in U.S. ex rel. Shea v. Cellco Partnership, Nos. 15-7135 & 15-7136, and the Fourth Circuit in U.S. ex rel. Carter v. Halliburton Co., No. 16-1262, both held that the first-to-file bar compels dismissal of actions brought while earlier-filed actions were pending, even if those earlier-filed actions have since been dismissed. Both courts also put the kibosh on those relators’ efforts to evade the first-to-file bar by amending their complaints after dismissal of the earlier-filed action. We’re proud to say that the attorneys of Vinson & Elkins, the same people who bring you LLB, represented the defendants in Carter and an amicus supporting the defendants in Shea.

Read More

False Claims Act Cert. Monitor: Attorneys’ Fees, Reverse False Claims, Public Disclosure Bar, and Government Employees as Relators Feature in Three New Petitions

Three new FCA relator cert. petitions have landed in the past few weeks, covering the gamut of FCA legal issues.

First, the relator in U.S. ex rel. Harper v. Muskingum Watershed Conservancy District, 16-1278, takes us back to 1L Property, alleging that the Army in 1949 granted the defendant water district a “determinable fee simple estate subject to a possibility of reverter interest retained by the United States.” In other words, the government gave the water district government land to keep so long as the land was used for recreation, conservation, etc. The relator contends that when the defendant entered into oil and gas leases on the land but kept the land and the lease income, it knowingly and improperly avoided an obligation to return the property and income to the government—i.e., a conversion reverse false claim. The question presented to the Court is whether, for a reverse false claim, the relator needed to plead that the defendant subjectively knew that it was violating the terms of the deed and had not committed a mistake of law. A potential difficulty for this petition, however, is that neither Sixth Circuit’s majority nor the dissent focused on the question of subjective knowledge of mistake of law, but rather on whether the relator pleaded sufficient facts from which the court could infer that the defendant “knew or should have known” of the requirement to return the property. The response is currently due June 26, 2017.

Read More

Filter By

Sign Up for Updates

Receive email news and alerts about False Claims Act/Qui Tam Litigation from V&E

Dates

Follow Us On Linkedin