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Climate Change Hero

Climate Change Blog

Top Asset Managers That Support Environmental Shareholder Proposals

Environmental shareholder activism at publicly traded companies in the U.S. features some of the largest investors in the world supporting proposals sponsored by some of the smallest investors in the world. From 2015 to the present, most environmental shareholder proposals were brought to annual meetings of companies by relatively unknown investment groups such as As You Sow, Mercy Investment Services, The Park Foundation, Trillium Asset Management, Calvert Asset Management, The Unitarian Universalist Association of Congregations and the Presbyterian Church of the USA. Only occasionally have these proposals been co-sponsored or sponsored by significantly larger pension funds in the U.S. market known for their interests in corporate environmental policy. With these proposals, these small investors have commanded degrees of attention at corporations highly disproportionate to their usually miniscule ownership stakes. The 2017 proxy season is likely to bring continued increases in visibility for these investors, with added support from a few of the world’s leading asset managers.

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How Leading Institutional Investors Vote on Environmental Shareholder Proposals

Leading U.S. asset managers are increasingly eager to explore the proposition that environmentally conscious policies drive shareholder value, but many of the same asset managers have not frequently voted for environment-related shareholder proposals on the proxy statements of U.S. public companies. The 2017 proxy season will test the readiness of major institutional investors to back environmental shareholder proposals and will reveal whether their past reluctance to do so has eased since 2016.

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  • 29
  • March
  • 2017

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Corporate Boards Keep Watch: BlackRock Again Emphasizes Linkages between Climate-Friendly Policies and Market Value

Institutional investors are increasingly emphasizing linkages between protection of the environment and long-term shareholder value in an effort to both strengthen shareholder value and to encourage other investors to seek more environmentally-conscious policies in the companies in which they invest. These large asset managers are paying attention to environmental factors in their portfolio management and engagement decisions not just to benefit the world, they say, but to protect and increase company value. For the moment, climate-related aspects of environmental protection are receiving a particularly high degree of attention from environmentally-focused asset managers and investors.

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  • 15
  • March
  • 2017

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Major Investment Manager Makes Climate-Related Disclosure a Priority for 2017-2018

Earlier this month the world’s largest asset manager, BlackRock, Inc., announced five “engagement priorities” for the coming year. Improving climate risk disclosure made BlackRock’s priority list alongside the more traditional areas of focus: governance, corporate strategy, compensation and human capital. BlackRock stated it will “engage companies most exposed to climate risk to understand their views on the TCFD [Task Force on Climate-related Financial Disclosures] recommendations and to encourage them to consider using this reporting framework as it is finalized and subsequently evolves over time.”

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  • 14
  • March
  • 2017

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EPA Withdraws Request for Information About GHG Emissions From the Oil and Gas Industry

On March 2, 2017, EPA announced that it was withdrawing its information collect request (the “ICR”) asking owners and operators in the oil and natural gas industry to provide information on equipment and air emissions at existing oil and gas operations. The withdrawal is effective immediately, meaning owners and operators—including those who have received an extension to their due dates for providing the information—are no longer required to respond to the request. Unlike other actions taken by the prior administration’s EPA, such as final regulations promulgated in compliance with the Administrative Procedure Act (“APA”), the ICR could be withdrawn without notice and comment, because it was not a rule subject to APA procedures.

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  • 17
  • February
  • 2017

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Beyond Regulations: What Additional Changes to Climate Change Policy Could Happen Under the Trump Administration?

The few public statements from then-candidate Trump regarding climate policy indicated that he will seek to reverse much of his predecessor’s course on laws and policies pursued in the name of preventing climate change, including the Paris Agreement and the Clean Power Plan. The President has also stated that he wants to cut regulations by 75%, and released an Executive Order limiting the creation of new regulations. But even outside of the realm of formal regulations, there are a number of climate-related policies of the previous administration that could be impacted by President Trump’s policy preferences.

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Contributors

Margaret E. Peloso

Margaret E. Peloso Counsel

Eric Groten

Eric Groten Partner

George C. Hopkins

George C. Hopkins Partner

Michael B. Wigmore

Michael B. Wigmore Partner

Mattew T. Dobbins

Matthew Dobbins Senior Associate

Tyler E. Robinson

Tyler E. Robinson Senior Associate

Theresa Romanosky

Theresa Romanosky Associate

Brandon M. Tuck

Brandon M. Tuck Senior Associate